Last weekend Minnesota saw an unfortunate spike in car accidents. The Father’s Day traffic collisions caused the highest traffic deaths in a single weekend since October 2016. The Minnesota Department of Public Safety says that 11 people were killed in eight separate crashes and collisions over the weekend. Alcohol is suspected in two of the crashes, drugs are suspected in two, and four of the crashes were speed-related. At least one of the fatalities wasn’t wearing a seatbelt.

Of the 11 who died, five were riding a motorcycle, five were in cars or trucks, and one (in St. Paul) was a pedestrian. According to the DPS, seven of the 11 fatalities happened in the seven-county Twin Cities metro area–including the crash near Vermillion, Dakota County, that claimed the lives of two fathers in separate vehicles. Also among those killed were Blaine police officer Steve Nanney and his wife, University of Minnesota professor Susie Nanney, who died near Elk River Friday in a head-on crash with a pickup truck.

The DPS says the “100 Deadliest Days” on Minnesota roads are between Memorial Day and Labor Day, and already 33 people have been killed on Minnesota roads since Memorial Day. During the same period last year, there were 26 deaths. The Father’s Day traffic collisions bring the total number of deaths on Minnesota roads in 2018 to 146, compared to 137 this time last year. Further, there have now been 19 motorcyclists killed this year, compared to 14 in 2017. Motorcycle deaths have more than doubled since the end of May, when there had been nine killed. Of the 19 who died in motorcycle crashes this year, only four of them were wearing helmets.

Injury Overview

If you’re involved in a non-fatal traffic accident, your injuries will likely still be a serious matter. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), more than three million people are injured each year in vehicle accidents across the country. The different injuries resulting from a car, truck, or motorcycle accident can be as varied as the individual circumstances of each collision. Specific factors include the following:

  • Were the individuals involved wearing seatbelts?
  • Where was the point of collision (front/side/rear of vehicle, etc.)?
  • Was the vehicle’s occupant facing in a certain direction?
  • Was it a low-speed collision or a high-speed crash?
  • Did the car have airbags?

Keep in mind that some injuries are not readily apparent following a car accident. Depending on the nature of the injury, it may take days, weeks, or even months for symptoms to appear. Some car accident injuries may resolve within a matter of days without any medical treatment at all. More serious injuries might become permanent and result in some level of physical disability.

Conclusion

If you are in a car accident, it is best to seek medical treatment for even the slightest discomfort. After contacting emergency services and/or a healthcare professional, remember that Nelson Personal Injury will also be ready to assist you. We know that you will have many questions about your rights and the claim process. Visit our FREE case evaluation page here, or call us today at (320)-252-1200. All consultations with our experienced Personal Injury attorneys are confidential and without obligation.

Note: This article uses information adapted from an original article by Adam Uren for BringMeTheNews.com, as well as an article by David Landers for Nolo.com. The full articles may be accessed at the links below.

https://bringmethenews.com/minnesota-news/fathers-day-weekend-was-the-deadliest-on-minnesota-roads-since-2016

https://www.nolo.com/legal-encyclopedia/what-the-most-common-vehicle-accident-injuries.html